The Beating of his Wings

by Paul Hoffman
3/5

Strangely, it was a much less violent ending than the one I expected. And, really, there’s no way anyone would call this book violence-free.

There is, after all, two instances of death by slow bludgeoning.

And, still, I felt it milder than the previous two. It might be because there were fewer deaths where Thomas Cale was directly involved and observing? I think I will blame it all on the strange and debilitating sickness that brings him down from the avenging angel thing he had going on before.

 

spoiler alert

I think this is ultimately a sad story, with a sad and anti-climatic ending. But it is the only way it could have gone. After all the suffering, the betrayals, the loss, and the life-or-death battles won… the only thing left for Cale is an absolute disappointment. And we’re left not knowing what becomes of him.

He gave everything of himself to save a world that didn’t want him.  they were so afraid of him because they didn’t understand him; because he didn’t operate under the same twisted and corrupt rules as they did. Bu, because it was the only way they knew, his way (that in no way was better nor worse) was simply scary and unacceptable.

And the three boys raised for nothing more but murder in a horrible place, don’t understand the world any more than the world understands them. And they have only each other and their war effort.

And then, not even that.

I really liked this series. I liked that it made me think about the silly things that have become acceptable in our society only because it is the only way we know. I liked that it makes fun of our baser selves without being funny. And I liked that this all continues to feel familiar while feeling totally new.

What I didn’t like was the strange illness that weakens and kind of disfigures Thomas Cale in this book. I didn’t see the point of it, and it felt like it was making the book unnecessarily long and slow at times.

I don’t know if I would read the third one again, but I definitely enjoyed the whole series and felt it was given a satisfying ending.

No closure whatsoever. That feels like the right kind of end for this story.

Advertisements

Trust vs Fear

C: ” They should have trusted me” 

IP: “No doubt. But they were afraid”.

The Beating of his Wings by Paul Hoffman

 

One of the things that make me root for Thomas Cale, even when in some moments he is the bad guy f the story, is that he just seems to rub people the wrong way. it is not really that he wrongs them (even when in some cases he does) but that evrybody keeps on betraing him out of fear or because they don’t undrstand him. It is just sad.

Girl Power

C: “You don’t know how to fight?”

A: “No. My arms are so weak I get out of breath lifting up a powder puff”

C: ” I could teach you”

A: “Only if you let me teach you how to wear a corset”.

C: “Why would I want to do that?”

A: “Exactly”

C: “Not exactly at all. I don’t want to be a girl”. 

A: ” And I don’t want to be a soldier. I want to be a general”. 

 

The Beating of His Wings by Paul Hoffman

The Left hand of God (2)

The Left Hand of God series

I just finished reading, World War Z, for what I think was the third or fourth time, and it left me feeling in the mood for something filled with a complex plot that can keep my brain more engaged than my emotions.

What do you think? Is The Beating of his Wings be a good choice?  If I remember correctly, everything was starting to go badly for my favorite psychotic murdering kid. He was sick, I think. Was it the lack of war opportunities? The monks were looking for him, right? He’s meant to end the world if I’m not mistaken.

I’ll finally get to the conclusion of this story.